I'm a lady with many thoughts!

28th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from We Are Star Stuff with 239,091 notes

kamilavender:

These are golden.

cracking up

Source: best-of-memes

26th August 2014

Post reblogged from Fosterhood in NYC with 63 notes

fosterhood:

I’ve gone from being anti-television to being so, so soooo grateful for it at 5:30am on the weekend.

And randomness part #2: I always thought Bert from Sesame Street was just a grumpy bump on a log, but clearly Ernie is a an impossible jerk.

15th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Hardly Ever with 29,094 notes

hipsterenglishteacher:

xzalor:

just saw this on facebook, thought I’d share

:(

Source: xzalor

13th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Untitled with 56,203 notes

brutereason:

These are from a wonderful book called The Art Of Comforting. Check it out and learn how to be better at supporting people going through difficult things.

Do good, be of service, love. 

Source: brutereason

12th August 2014

Quote reblogged from mr. jangles with 6 notes

Mental illness is a flaw in chemistry, not character.
— (via superhomogay)

10th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Sex+ with 12,148 notes

Source: weheartit.com

5th August 2014

Post with 1 note

Aww mushy gushy lovey stuff

Just realized (after two and a half years) that Patrick’s most consistent response to my “I love you” is him quoting Star Wars. Soooooo once again our love is confirmed forever. 

Tagged: nerdboysloveboyfriendstar wars

4th August 2014

Quote reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR with 52,827 notes

I firmly believe in small gestures: pay for their coffee, hold the door for strangers, over tip, smile or try to be kind even when you don’t feel like it, pay compliments, chase the kid’s runaway ball down the sidewalk and throw it back to him, try to be larger than you are— particularly when it’s difficult. People do notice, people appreciate. I appreciate it when it’s done to (for) me. Small gestures can be an effort, or actually go against our grain (“I’m not a big one for paying compliments…”), but the irony is that almost every time you make them, you feel better about yourself. For a moment life suddenly feels lighter, a bit more Gene Kelly dancing in the rain.
— Jonathan Carroll  (via theremina)

Source: quotethat

4th August 2014

Photo reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR with 2,715 notes

Source: pandorasbox6

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Sex+ with 5,529 notes

lacigreen:

Was talking about #WomenAgainstFeminism today on Twitter, a trend that I see largely as a reaction to (1) extremist feminist politics found readily online and (2) ignorance/stereotypes about feminism.  I tried to handle my frustration with a bit humor but quickly realized this is actually a really emotionally-fraught topic for people.  Maybe not the time for sarcasm.Most the time, feminism in action doesn’t explicitly call itself feminism. I’m talking about things like campaigning for sex ed, same sex marriage, equal pay, maternity leave, reproductive health access, transgender health care, representation, implementing sexual assault/harassment policies, getting women into stem, etc. I think this confused void about what feminists *actually do and believe in* allows the space to be sensationalized by a loud, extreme minority and predatory media sources who see a “hot story”. Mainstream onlookers who don’t know their history or what feminism is (and don’t take a second to learn…) naturally take the bait and then end up railing against something that isn’t even an accurate representation of feminism in the first place. Then feminists are pissed, and anti-feminists are pissed (though misogynists are usually quite happy) and we’ve whipped ourselves up a nice divisive shitstorm of “whose side are you on”?I understand it’s unpopular amongst some feminists to concede that extremism exists; “there’s nothing wrong with radical action” and “they’re a part of the movement too”! I think those are valid points (and I certainly don’t think the solution is to silence/disown anyone), but I also think we have to admit that it can really alienate people from the cause, and perhaps #WomenAgainstFeminism is proof.  What do you think?

lacigreen:

Was talking about #WomenAgainstFeminism today on Twitter, a trend that I see largely as a reaction to (1) extremist feminist politics found readily online and (2) ignorance/stereotypes about feminism.  I tried to handle my frustration with a bit humor but quickly realized this is actually a really emotionally-fraught topic for people.  Maybe not the time for sarcasm.

Most the time, feminism in action doesn’t explicitly call itself feminism. I’m talking about things like campaigning for sex ed, same sex marriage, equal pay, maternity leave, reproductive health a
ccess, transgender health care, representation, implementing sexual assault/harassment policies, getting women into stem, etc. I think this confused void about what feminists *actually do and believe in* allows the space to be sensationalized by a loud, extreme minority and predatory media sources who see a “hot story”. Mainstream onlookers who don’t know their history or what feminism is (and don’t take a second to learn…) naturally take the bait and then end up railing against something that isn’t even an accurate representation of feminism in the first place. Then feminists are pissed, and anti-feminists are pissed (though misogynists are usually quite happy) and we’ve whipped ourselves up a nice divisive shitstorm of “whose side are you on”?

I understand it’s unpopular amongst some feminists to concede that extremism exists; “there’s nothing wrong with radical action” and “they’re a part of the movement too”! I think those are valid points (and I certainly don’t think the solution is to silence/disown anyone), but I also think we have to admit that it can really alienate people from the cause, and perhaps #WomenAgainstFeminism is proof.  What do you think?